Museo Casa de Cervantes: The Former Home of Don Quixote’s Father

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Museo Casa de Cervantes (House of Cervantes Museum) is a museum dedicated to the life and work of Spain’s greatest writer, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra.

"Oh yeah...the guy who fought the windmill!"

The museum is the former home of Cervantes who lived in Valladolid with his family from 1604 – 1606. He completed his masterpiece, El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quijote de la Mancha, here and published it in 1605. Monarch Alfonso XIII and Archer Huntington, then-president of the Hispanic Society of America, purchased the property in 1912 and later donated it to the State. The building was officially inaugurated as the Museo Casa de Cervantes on April 12, 1948.

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Take a brief phototour of the museum after the jump. As always, all photos can be found on my Flickr. Continue reading “Museo Casa de Cervantes: The Former Home of Don Quixote’s Father”

Segovia, Spain: Romans, Goths and Catholics

I wonder if History teachers in Spain toss their written materials out the window and book a field trip for their students in place of a lecture. It wouldn’t surprise me if this were the case considering the amount of living history and architecture contained, for example, in a city such as Segovia.

Segovia is home to many pieces of architecture that hold a significant spot in history, so much so that UNESCO declared in 1985 that a portion of the city to be a World Heritage site.

Segovia’s most notable piece of history is a Roman aqueduct that is nearly 2,000 years old and erected without the use of cement or mortar. The city is also home to a large Alcázar (castle) where various monarchs including Alfonso X El Sabio (Alfonso X The Learned/Wise), Los Reyes Católicos (The Catholic Kings), Felipe II (Phillip II) and Carlos III (Charles III) lived and exercised their power.

There is also an enormous Gothic cathedral that contains 23 chapels built  in 1525 at the behest of Emperador Carlos V (Emperor Charles V).

Below are a number of photos of these monuments as well as other photos from my time in Segovia. All can be seen on my Flickr.

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segovia014 Continue reading “Segovia, Spain: Romans, Goths and Catholics”

A Visit to Museo Nacional Colegio de San Gregorio (St. Gregory’s College National Museum)

A highlight of my stay in Valladolid, Spain was my group’s trip to the city’s nationally-recognized museum of religious sculpture at Colegio de San Gregorio. The museum hosts an incredible collection of religious sculptures and paintings from the 15th – 18th centuries. Highlights from my visit are below and, as always, all photos from my visit (nearly 200!) can be seen on my Flickr.

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colegio_sangregorio_040 Continue reading “A Visit to Museo Nacional Colegio de San Gregorio (St. Gregory’s College National Museum)”

A Weekend Jaunt to Pamplona for the Running of the Bulls (Fiesta de San Fermin)

The Fiesta de San Fermin is an annual festival held in Pamplona, Spain most famous for the daily encierro a.k.a. the running of the bulls. The event was thrilling and tiring (my friends and I slept on a patch of lawn outside the bullring alongside hundreds of others without accomodations) but well worth it. I’m definitely going to return to Pamplona a few more times while I’m still able to. Some of my favorite photos are below. You can see the entire set on my Flickr.

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